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Occupations

Discussion in 'Occupations' started by Heather, Jun 1, 2013.

  1. Heather

    Heather LostCousins Member

    I have looked around the LC site and entered "occupations" in the search box and I cannot find this site listed anywhere. I'm not sure if this is the correct procedure for entering interesting sites that others may find useful but I use this site quite a lot Hall genealogy link to old occupations There are many interesting links on this site including military, illnesses and medical terms, to name a few, that is if you have an hour or two to spare !!
     
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  2. AdrienneQ

    AdrienneQ Moderator Staff Member

    Hi Heather thanks for the link, and yes it is the correct procedure apart from how we try to enter a slightly more meaningful label over the URL rather then the URL itself.
    We already have this link under "old occupations" but our way of entering the label may have masked it in your search.
    I will re-label your link (I am the Moderator) but make it different from the other one to help in future searches
     
  3. Bob Spiers

    Bob Spiers LostCousins Star

    OK, here's one for all you handwriting sleuths, what on earth is the occupation of this ancestor of mine (born 1883) as shown in the 1911 Census where he is shown as a Worker. Is the first word meant to be Scrap or Strap followed by Bumper? And (Industry or Service with which worker is connected) as "Metal ?" occupation query JH.JPG

    The transcription insists he is a Srap Bumper
     
  4. Helen7

    Helen7 LostCousins Superstar

    The industry looks like "Metal Rolling".
     
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  5. Pauline

    Pauline LostCousins Star

    Well, strictly speaking the transcription is correct as I think it probably does say Srap Bumper. But I would guess it was meant to be Scrap Bumper otherwise known as a Scrap Bundler. That is, someone who gathered up into bundles the bits of scrap left from the metal rolling process - possibly rolling tin plate.
     
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  6. Bob Spiers

    Bob Spiers LostCousins Star

    Thanks Helen & Pauline, I think I will settle for Scrap Bundler.
     
  7. Alexander Bisset

    Alexander Bisset Administrator Staff Member

    It is marked as occupation 679, I did have a link to a list of 1911 occupations at one point but can’t find it now. They indexed them all for statistical purposes.
     
  8. Heather

    Heather LostCousins Member

    I found the list on FMP, sorry but it isn't much help, 679 is listed as "other metal workers".
     
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  9. Bob Spiers

    Bob Spiers LostCousins Star

    Another occupation that has me baffled, well in part because it appears (after quite some struggle) to read 'School Master & Stationer - employing 1 man and 1 boy' Something doesn't seem right with that interpretation, so can anyone do better please? (Male aged 29 in Kenilworth, Warwickshire)
    upload_2020-1-11_11-13-24.png
     
  10. Pauline

    Pauline LostCousins Star

    That's how I would read it, except that Schoolmaster is one word. What doesn't seem right to you?
     
  11. Bob Spiers

    Bob Spiers LostCousins Star

    Well apart from the fact I have since discovered likely the wrong ancestor (same name, same place, and -/+ 1 year to the one I seek)..staying with this one ... a 29 years old school master (ok schoolmaster) and Stationer, employing 1 man and boy. A sideline employment (employer) does not gel with me I'm afraid. I did check a later census where he reverts to a school master, so seems to have abandoned his stationery business. Thanks for input Pauline.
     
  12. Helen7

    Helen7 LostCousins Superstar

    Picking up on this thread again reminded me of an ancestor's occupation I came across in the 1841 census that's puzzled me for a long time. The ancestor in question was aged 70 in 1841 and this is the only census he appeared in before his death in 1842. According to his only daughter's 1813 baptism record, he was a goldsmith, and I found various insurance records in the National Archives which placed him at the same address as the census (in Clerkenwell, London) and describes him as a jeweller.

    However, the occupation on the census looks like 'Bucket m.' Perhaps it should be Bracelet maker but it doesn't look like that to me. It's the middle occupation in the picture. I've included his neighbours for comparison - the one at the top also had me puzzled, looks like Water Gilder, which Google tells me involves 'applying loose sheets of gold on a layer of red clay'o_O The bottom one I can see is walking stick maker. The line through each doesn't help of course. I'd be interested to hear others' opinions.

    1841 England Census-occupations.jpg

    EDIT: Oh, and I now see that 'Water Gilder' appears in the 'Hall genealogy link to old occupations' posted by Heather at the start of this thread!
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2020
  13. Pauline

    Pauline LostCousins Star

    I agree, it does look like 'Bucket m', although the line across does make it difficult to be sure.

    One possibility, bearing in mind this chap was previously given as a goldsmith, would be that he was actually a Buckle maker, and that Bucket is an enumerator's error - perhaps a misreading of 'Buckel'?
     
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  14. Pauline

    Pauline LostCousins Star

    You mean the idea of a schoolmaster also having another occupation? I don't think that was particularly unusual. I am not sure what year this was, but don't forget hours of schooling etc were not the same as today. And, for example, some mills had their own schools, with the children learning in the morning and working in the mill in the afternoon. A school master who taught only in the morning might well have another job in the afternoons.
     
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