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Remembering the Fallen

Discussion in 'Comments on the latest newsletter' started by jorghes, Nov 3, 2018.

  1. peter

    peter Administrator Staff Member

    And the National Register wasn't compiled until 15th August 1915 - it may have been the trigger for your ancestor to return to Australia.
     
  2. jorghes

    jorghes LostCousins Member

    Probably not, since he married in Rockhampton on the 24th August 1915, and the likelihood is that he met his wife before he went home and possibly went home to tell them about her.
    He had been given the money to come to Australia, and was probably gifted the money to go home to Scotland as well - he'd originally come to Australia as a missionary (!) and was a Baptist minister for the rest of his life, so there was never a lot of money in the family, most definitely not enough to get them back to Scotland for a holiday. My grandmother will willingly tell you how long it took before they had running water in any of the manses she lived in as a child.

    I checked again, he arrived in London in May 1914 - would presumably have been in Scotland for the outbreak of war, and sailed back out of Liverpool in September 1914.

    The family story was that one of his brother died in the War, although I have disproved this (rather he died of TB in Edinburgh in 1929 at the age of 39), but I haven't been able to find out whether or not any of my great-grandfather's brothers served in the war - it seems unlikely for two of them and the most likely is the one who died young, but I haven't been able to find the proof, and may never be able to.
     
  3. peter

    peter Administrator Staff Member

    There are medal cards for most soldiers who served, but if the name is a common one you might have trouble identifying him (particular since there are often errors in army records).
     
  4. jorghes

    jorghes LostCousins Member

    Pretty common (John Andrew Wright) unfortunately not as unique as some of his brothers!
     
  5. Helen7

    Helen7 LostCousins Star

    There is a John Andrew Wright from Edinburgh in the 'Royal Tank Corps Enlistment Records, 1919-1934' on FMP, which states he originally enlisted on 27 Nov 1914, then re-enlisted in 1920. I've no idea if it's your relative, but there's lots of detail in the image, including his occupation and his mother's name and full address, so you can check if it fits. I found my great uncle in these records and was able to confirm it was him because of his home address (which was the house where my mother was born!). It seems that Army Order 124 of 1919 offered financial incentives to soldiers to re-enlist - as a reserve force for ongoing peacetime military commitments following WW1 - and my great uncle signed up for 4 yrs 3 months (for which he would have received a £50 bounty – worth having in 1919!). It looks like your relative may have done the same (as many thousands did, apparently). I couldn't trace my great uncle's army record (presumably destroyed in the blitz) but this record gave his regimental numbers and so I was able to trace his medal card too.
     
  6. jorghes

    jorghes LostCousins Member

    I think I've looked at that one before - while the name of his mother is correct (her name was Jane), the age given for that John Andrew Wright is wrong (he was born in 1890, not 1892) and his mother would have been living in Nairn at the time, not in Edinburgh... Plus, this one says that this John Andrew Wright was discharged in 1937, mine died in 1929 - and I know this is correct because I have his death register with the name of his brother on it - his is rather distinct (James Hay Shaw Wright) as he was named after his step-grandfather - if mine did serve, he would have had to have discharged after the war.
     
  7. Helen7

    Helen7 LostCousins Star

    Good point! Though I wonder - as it was an army reserve - whether the discharge might be a nominal date and they may not have known he'd died (?!) However, the other non-matching information suggests it's the wrong person (though ages are often wrong on army records). As you say, a rather common name...
     
  8. jorghes

    jorghes LostCousins Member

    Pretty much - I don't think that is him, but you never really know I suppose. I think I once found a record on the National Archives website that referred to the correct name and made a comment about TB (which is what John died from), but I've lost the screen shot I took of it!
     

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